Return to Holy Reverence

“Behold, my servant shall deal prudently, he shall be exalted and extolled, and be very high.” —Isaiah 52:13

One of the most tragic graces we have lost today in our Christianity is the fear of the LORD, and reverence for Jesus Christ, in particular. As the enemy, the world, or corrupt flesh delight to tear us away from God’s holy Word and the truth at the center of Christ, and Him crucified, and the more we forget, or forsake, the truth of the Cross, the greater the caricature we make of our Lord. Soon, the holy and beloved Son of God becomes our pal, our bro, our home boy, and a host of other common titles, that though the names are not offensive in and of themselves, the mere thought of the irreverence directed toward the holy Redeemer should turn our stomachs and bring forth from our eyes a fountain of tears.

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Psalm 4

“Stand in awe, and sin not: commune with your own heart upon your bed, and be still. Selah.” —Psalm 4:4

The Scottish Psalter was written anonymously in 1635 and published and appointed for use in worship by the Church of Scotland in 1650. Scripture paraphrases were added in 1781. The Scottish Psalter and Paraphrases was the primary hymnal used by the Church of Scotland through the 19th century. The Scottish Psalter was originally contained in one volume. When the Scripture paraphrases were added in the 18th century, its addition expanded the singular volume.

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Who Would True Valour See

“Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might. Put on the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.” —Ephesians 6:10-12

“Who Would True Valour See” is a hymn that has also been changed in more modern times to “He Who Would Valiant Be.” Written by John Bunyan (1628-1688), this hymn first appeared in Part 2 of Mr. Bunyan’s allegorical classic, The Pilgrim’s Progress. The hymn itself is placed in the story just prior to Valiant and Great-Heart arriving at the Enchanted Ground.

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Psalm 3

“Salvation belongeth unto the LORD: thy blessing is upon thy people. Selah.” —Psalm 3:8

The Scottish Psalter was written anonymously in 1635 and published and appointed for use in worship by the Church of Scotland in 1650. Scripture paraphrases were added in 1781. The Scottish Psalter and Paraphrases was the primary hymnal used by the Church of Scotland through the 19th century. The Scottish Psalter was originally contained in one volume. When the Scripture paraphrases were added in the 18th century, its addition expanded the singular volume.

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Thou Art the Way

“Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by Me.” —John 14:6

“Thou Art the Way” is a hymn penned by George Washington Doane (1799-1859). The hymn first appeared in Songs by the Way, published in 1826. John 14:6 was the inspirational text for Mr. Doane’s hymn. It may be more easily recognized by the title given the hymn in the 1860 publication of the hymnal, “I Am the Way, and the Truth, and the Life.”

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Psalm 2

“Serve the LORD with fear, and rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when His wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in Him.” —Psalm 2:11, 12

William Goode (1762-1816), born in Buckingham, England, was a minister in the Church of England. He was the author of several books and penned many hymns, including a book containing the Biblical psalms published in 1811 titled, An Entire New Version of the Book of Psalms (it’s full title being, An Entire New Version of the Book of Psalms: in which an attempt is made to accommodate them to the worship of the Christian Church: in a variety of measures now in general use: with original prefaces and notes, critical and explanatory).

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Walking with God

“And Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him.” —Genesis 5:24

“Walking with God” is a hymn penned by William Cowper (1731-1800), first appearing in Olney Hymns published in 1779. Genesis 5:24 was the inspirational text that prompted Mr. Cowper’s hymn. It is often more commonly listed in more modern hymnals by the words of its first line, “Oh! for a closer walk with God.”

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