Special Assistance for Pilgrims

“That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For they that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit the things of the Spirit.” —Romans 8:5, 6

The Christian who walks after the Spirit is the general course of direction for one who is saved. This spiritual walk means a desire for holiness for Christ and righteousness in Christ because of the believer’s desire to please God. Does that mean we never sin? All the text we have read since Romans 6 would have been ridiculous in exhorting us to newness of life if salvation meant that all sin was eliminated from our lives when once we’ve been regenerated. These two doctrines, (1) absolute perfection; and (2) unrestrained, unrepentant sin in the Christian’s life, are both lies of the darkness of this age. How do we combat sin as we walk according to the Spirit? The answer to that is to walk in the Spirit, according to Galatians 5:16, “This I say then, Walk in the Spirit, and ye shall not fulfil the lust of the flesh.”

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Which Way to Walk

“For they that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit the things of the Spirit.” —Romans 8:5

Carnality, that is, living a life that is generally characterized by habitual sin, is offensive to Christ; and why wouldn’t it be? Last week, we saw specifically in Romans 8:3 how that Jesus, in His own body, endured the Cross, suffering God’s wrath for our sins to redeem us from our sins. He died that we might have life; are we then to look at sin lightly? Are we to casually wink at sin when such a sacrifice of infinite worth and eternal value was offered on my behalf, on your behalf? Certainly not.

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Walking with God

“And Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him.” —Genesis 5:24

“Walking with God” is a hymn penned by William Cowper (1731-1800), first appearing in Olney Hymns published in 1779. Genesis 5:24 was the inspirational text that prompted Mr. Cowper’s hymn. It is often more commonly listed in more modern hymnals by the words of its first line, “Oh! for a closer walk with God.”

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